Building Business Credit

Biz Credit is Important Too

In the past you’ve heard me speak, and maybe even have received information from me on a variety of business related funding products. You know how challenging it is to get capital in this mercurial economic environment, and I’ve striven to keep you informed with the most up to date info.

I understand that building positive business credit is serious, it takes time and dedication on the part of any business owner. For several years I’ve researched “Building Business Credit”. I’ve interviewed dozens of purveyors of the product. Never have I endorsed one because I didn’t want my sterling reputation tarnished. Over promise……..Under deliver…….was the typical mantra. Charging enormous up front fees and additional “points” on the back end…..They all sing the same tune. Until now……..

Self-Directed IRA

Become Your Own Bank

The Self-Directed IRA (SDIRA) puts you in control of your qualified accounts such as IRA’s, 401(k)’s,  403(b)’s, Keogh’s, SEP’s and more. With a SDIRA you have the flexibility to invest in real estate, mortgages, businesses, franchises, tax liens etc.  This gives you, not Wall Street, discretionary control of investment options, whether traditional or non-traditional. A Self-Directed IRA is a retirement plan that allows the account owner to direct investment decisions on behalf of the retirement plan. Basically, an SDIRA is a unique hybrid tool that utilizes a self-directed IRA custodian and a specialized legal structure. With an SDIRA you will have a checkbook, a debit card and all the tools that come along with a business checking account.

The SDIRA owner can use his retirement funds for a multitude of investments providing a higher potential rate of return. All you need to know are the few things you cannot do and the rest is up to your imagination.

The Midas Guide to Credit and Business Funding

Well, after several years of research I’ve finally published my much anticipated E-book.  The Midas Guide to Credit and Business Funding is now available by going to:  www.bizfunding101.com.  And yes I’m pretty excited.  The hard launch was Monday and we’ve sold five books so far.

The book is broken into three sections.  The first section talks about both business and personal credit and dispels all myths about each.  Loaded with nothing but the facts and what you need to have to enjoy perfect personal and business credit.  The second section reveals all loan products available to a small biz owner.  In laymans terms, I describe each and every product so you can make an educated decision as to how and where you fit.  The third section is about something no one has ever written.  You all know I’m a loan broker.  I charge fees! Those fees can sometimes be hard to swallow.  With this guide I am providing the exact model I use to get people funded every day.  I tell you everything you need in your funding package and I give you two hours of personal counseling on picking a product and getting funded.  This sounds mundane but what if you could get the money you need and not have to pay thousands in broker fees?

Is the Economy Right to Start a Small Business?

Timing Timing Timing

If you are thinking about starting a small business now is as good of time as any even with the current state of the {financial crisis|economy}. Now why is this you might be asking yourself? If money is so bad for everyone what is going to make the want to come out and buy from you? Read on to see that the urge to start your own small business is a very savvy thing to do even in hard economical times.

Any successful small business venture is going to need a very quality and well written business plan. If you do not have a solid Small Business Plan in place they you are setting yourself and your business up for failure. When you are starting your own business you not only want to find something that you love you want to be able to fill a niche product that is going to help make your business stand out from the crowd.

Standing on shoulders — how great is your business?

Learning experiences

My best business lessons come from my clients. Central among these lessons is that good businesses make money, but great businesses build communities that make good business possible. “Great businesses” doesn’t mean only big public corporations. Private businesses are not only the foundation of our economy – they are essential to civic infrastructure. No other group of community leaders brings to bear the skills and entrepreneurial drive of the man or woman who owns a business.

A company that invests in its community not just money, but the talent and passion of its people, especially its owners, positions itself to move from being a success to being significant. “Being a good corporate citizen is good for business. Companies that give by donating money, products and services or volunteer time gain recognition by supporting their communities. Corporate giving can increase your company’s visibility, reputation for goodwill and employees’ sense of purpose.” — The Denver Office of Strategic Partnership’s Business Good Citizenship Kit.

The Missing Inc.

Properly naming your company

A friend referred a new business client to me recently. I’ll call the corporation “Guys and Dolls.” Only problem is its legal name should be “Guys and Dolls, Inc.” or “Guys and Dolls Company” or something which indicates it is a corporation. Similarly, if Guys and Dolls was a limited liability company, it would need to include LLC or such in its legal name.

The owner of Guys and Dolls formed the corporation through the Colorado Secretary of State, which warns that corporate designators are required under state law but still allows a user to file without one. Guys and Dolls compounded that incorporation mistake by using the Inc-less name to refer to itself in all of its business dealings.

Heavy Duty: More Liability Traps for Business Owners

Forewarned is forearmed

Unless you were daydreaming during history class, in high school you learned that the birth of modern limited liability business entities, namely corporations, was a key factor in the Industrial Revolution and America’s emergence as a world economic leader. An investment of capital that risks only that capital, not the investor’s other assets, has been at the heart of capitalism ever since. This is especially true, but often challenging, in human-owned businesses where the people who invest the capital are often investing blood, sweat and tears as business management, too.

Typically, the law splits management of a corporation into two functions: the officers (President, Secretary, Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, etc.), who run the day-to-day operations, and the Board of Directors, which supervises the officers and keeps a long term view in mind. Yes, I know that if public company Boards of Directors really did that, we wouldn’t be in our current economic pickle, but that’s not today’s subject; my concern is that people in private companies don’t keep track of the hats they wear (owner, officer and/or director) and the consequences that go with wearing them.

It’s Legal Week

Hello everyone.  After a long holiday week it’s time to get back to work.   One of the things us business owners always seem to slack off on is the legal end of running our business.  Therefore, I have asked my friend, Jim Thomas, of Minor and Brown, to write a few articles that I am going to portray on the blog this week.

Jim is one of the most knowledgeable business attorneys I know.  He has helped hundreds of business owners get out of sticky situations, not to mention preventing them from being there in the first place.  Stay tuned and read em all.  They’ll save you tons of time and money in the future.

Best,

Darrell

Why a Paydex Score is Important

Everyone knows what a FICO score is.  If you’re a business owner you better know what a Paydex score is and why it’s important these days.  Paydex is the equivalent of a consumers FICO score.  It measures your businesses credit worthiness and is being looked at more and more by lenders.

Business credit agencies use this business scoring system to determine the credit rating of small businesses.  Dun & Bradstreet and Experian are two of the larger ones.  You can simply sign up at www.dnb.com.  You will be assigned a number and then it’s up to you to build your credit in a similar fashion as you would your FICO score.

Paydex scores range from 0 to 100.  Anything 80 and above is good and where you must be in order to obtain business financing.  Below 80, and just like a FICO score, you can have problems.