Self-Directed IRA

Become Your Own Bank

The Self-Directed IRA (SDIRA) puts you in control of your qualified accounts such as IRA’s, 401(k)’s,  403(b)’s, Keogh’s, SEP’s and more. With a SDIRA you have the flexibility to invest in real estate, mortgages, businesses, franchises, tax liens etc.  This gives you, not Wall Street, discretionary control of investment options, whether traditional or non-traditional. A Self-Directed IRA is a retirement plan that allows the account owner to direct investment decisions on behalf of the retirement plan. Basically, an SDIRA is a unique hybrid tool that utilizes a self-directed IRA custodian and a specialized legal structure. With an SDIRA you will have a checkbook, a debit card and all the tools that come along with a business checking account.

The SDIRA owner can use his retirement funds for a multitude of investments providing a higher potential rate of return. All you need to know are the few things you cannot do and the rest is up to your imagination.

Your Children and Credit

Educate Your Children about Money and Credit

Parents, start building your children’s credit early – and do it well. Build credit early for your children – even before college starts, if they plan to take out student loans. Sign over an account that they must pay on time each month. Get a credit card with a low limit, and a bank account that you help them manage monthly. Avoid opening several charge cards at once in their name – not only will they be hard to repay, but having new accounts when they have a short credit history will cause their credit rating to drop. Encourage them to get a part-time job.

“The Credit Card Act of 2009 sought to temper aggressive marketing of credit cards to students by restricting campus promotions and requiring students younger than 21 to have a co-signer, unless they have enough income to get their own card.” And banks are unwilling to offer credit education to their customers. “They do not tell us that no credit is as bad as poor credit. Banks and educational institutions certainly do not think it is their responsibility to conquer the critical task of teaching children about credit.”

Learn About Money

Make learning about money a priority

There’s a lot to learn about money, and there’s plenty of free information available. The Federal Reserve education web site,  offers personal financial education information and links to many useful resources.

Look for organizations in your community that can help you learn more about setting financial goals, budgeting, saving, using credit wisely and getting the best deal. Whether you attend information sessions at different venues, read about money in books, magazines, newspapers, or online, learning how to manage your money is an important part of life.

Here are some other possibilities:

  • Nonprofit credit counseling service.
  • Library.
  • Community college.
  • Bank or credit union.
  • Nonprofit community development corporation.
  • Nonprofit housing organization.
  • Religious organization.
  • Senior citizen center.
  • Employee assistance program.
  • Cooperative extension service.